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Tornado

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Tornado Watch...

A tornado watch is issued by the National Weather Service when the weather conditions are such that tornados are likely to develop. This is the time to remind family members where the safest places are located, keep alert for changing weather conditions and listen to the radio or television for further advisories.
Tornado Warning....

A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or indicated by radar. At this point, the danger is very serious and everyone should go to a safe place turn on a battery-operated radio or television and wait for the "all-clear" by the authorities.

During Severe Weather events KCCU Radio (89.3 or 102.7) and KSWO-TV (Channel 7) will simulcast.

Monitor the TV or Listen to the Radio if your area could be in danger!

You can also monitor your NOAA Weather Radio for the earliest warnings!


Tornado Danger Signs:

* Large Hail: Tornados are spawned from very powerful thunderstorms and the most powerful storms produce large hail. Tornados frequently emerge from near the hail-producing portion of the storm.
* Calm before the storm: Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still.
* Cloud of Debris: An approaching cloud of debris can mark the location of a tornado even if a funnel is not visible.
* Funnel Cloud: A visible rotating extension of the cloud base is a sign that a tornado may develop. A tornado is evident when one or more of the clouds turns greenish and a dark funnel descends.
* Roaring Noise: The high winds of a tornado can cause a roar that is often compared to the sound of a freight train.
* Calm behind the Storm: Tornados generally occur near the trailing edge of a severe thunderstorm. It is not uncommon to see clear, sunlit skies behind a tornado.


During a Tornado....

If at home...

* Go at once to the basement, storm cellar or the lowest level of the building.
* If there is no basement, go to an inner hallway or a small inner room without windows, such as a bathroom or closet.
* Get away from windows.
* Go to the center of the room. Stay away from corners, as they tend to attract debris.
* Use your arms to cover your head and neck.

If outdoors...

* If possible, get into a building.
* If shelter is not available or there is no time to get indoors, lie in a ditch or low-lying area or crouch near a strong building.
* Use your arms to cover and protect your head and neck.

If in a boat...

* Put on life jacket.
* Head toward land
* If possible, get into a building.
* If shelter is not available or there is no time to get indoors, lie in a ditch or low-lying area or crouch near a strong building.
* Use arms to protect head and neck.

If at work or in a public building (church, school or office)...

* Go to the basement or to an inside hallway at the lowest level.
* Avoid wide rooms such as auditoriums, cafeterias or large hallways.
* Get under a piece of sturdy furniture such as a workbench or heavy table or desk and hold on to it.
* Use your arms to cover and protect your head and neck.

If in a car...

* Never try to out drive a tornado in a car or truck. Tornados can change direction quickly and can lift a car or truck and toss it through the air.
* Get out of the car immediately and take shelter in a nearby building, if possible.
* If there is no time to get indoors, get out of the car and lie in a ditch or low-lying area away from the vehicle.

After the Tornado....

* Check for injured or trapped persons.
* Give first aid when appropriate. Do not try to move a seriously injured person unless the person is in immediate danger of further injury. Call 911 for help if the telephones still work.
* Turn on radio or television to get latest emergency information.
* Clean up spilled medicines, bleach, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. Leave the building if you smell gas or chemical fumes.
* Stay out of damaged buildings. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.