Comanche County, Oklahoma

Welcome to the official website for Comanche County Government. Here you will find information on many programs and services, as well as subjects of interest to residents and visitors. We are here to offer assistance in making Comanche County a great place to live, work and play.

 

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Don Hawthorne named to ASCOG

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Comanche County commissioners Monday named Western District Comanche County Commissioner Don Hawthorne to represent them to the Association of South Central Oklahoma Governments for one-year term beginning in June.

Hawthorne is currently representing the county at ASCOG through the end of the current term, which ends in June, a position he took over from former Central District Commissioner Ron Kirby when Kirby resigned. ASCOG helps local governments obtain grants and other funds from state and federal agencies.

During the public comment portion of the commissioners’ meeting, Brian Jones, who lives off of Southeast 60th Street, returned to check on his request from the March 26 meeting. Jones complained at the previous meeting about his neighbor’s running water pumps on Nine Mile Creek during late-night hours.

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Storm season calls for preparedness

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With the spring severe weather season approaching, it’s important for people to knowhow to stay safe if a tornado strikes.

Comanche County Emergency Management Director Clint Wagstaff offered a number of tips for dealing with tornadoes.

First, people need to understand the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning. A watch means weather conditions are conducive to tornadoes forming. A warning means a tornado has been sighted.
Wagstaff said people need to pay attention to local television or radio stations if severe weather is likely.
Another option, he said, is to purchase a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-approved emergency radio. They are designed to sound an alert if a severe weather warning is issued by NOAA. The devices can be purchased at most large retailers.
“Be sure it has battery backup,” Wagstaff warned, other- wise it will be useless if there is a power failure, which frequently happens during severe weather.
People can also sign up for Nixle, a free service that sends out alerts about emergency situations, including weather, through text messages and e-mails. You can sign up for Nixle at the Comanche County government website, www.co  manchecounty.us  .
If a tornado warning is issued, people in mobile homes need to evacuate, no matter what, since mobile homes are too flimsy to withstand tornadoes. They should go to the nearest storm shelter or a house or other solid building.
People in houses and other buildings who do not have access to a storm shelter should go to the interior of the building, away from windows. Often a bathroom is a good choice, since the plumbing infrastructure provides added stability.
“Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can,” Wagstaff said.
If you are driving when a tornado hits, get out of the car immediately and seek shelter in a building, or if none is available, a ditch or other low point.
He said people should also make an emergency kit and keep it where they can get to it at a moment’s notice. The ? kit should ? contain enough ready-to-eat food, bottled water and any needed medications to last for three days.
Wagstaff said people should not attempt to go to public storm shelters but should take shelter in their homes if possible. It is statistically safer to “shelter in place” instead of trying to go to a public shelter, he added.
Wagstaff said more people are killed attempting to reach public shelters during a tornado than die while taking appropriate shelter in their homes.
Many public shelters are located in businesses that may not be open when a tornado hits, he said.
He said people who live in an apartment complex or mobile home park should contact the manager to see what safety plans and designated shelters are offered where they live.
Finally, Wagstaff said people who have private storm shelters need to contact Comanche County Emergency Management to register them, so emergency personnel will know where to search for them in the event of a disaster. He said the department does not share information about private storm shelters except with emergency workers if a disaster occurs.

With the spring severe weather season approaching, it’s important for people to know how to stay safe if a tornado strikes.

Comanche County Emergency Management Director Clint Wagstaff offered a number of tips for dealing with tornadoes.

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